Hogwarts Youth Shabbos

Rabbi’s Blog

Tzidkas Hatzadik #57 – The Benefits of Feeling Guilty

http://files.nertamid.net/shiurim/Apps/recordings/T57.mp3Podcast: Download

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#929 – shemos, chapter 9

http://files.nertamid.net/shiurim/Apps/recordings/929shemos9.mp3Podcast: Download

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Bereishis – An Introduction to the Flood

http://files.nertamid.net/shiurim/Apps/recordings/Noach1.mp3Podcast: Download

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Daily Halacha – The Day After Sukkos

After Sukkos, one may dispose of their Lulav and Esrog in a way that is not degrading. Although some have the custom of burning them with their Chameitz so as to include them in another Mitzvah one may wrap them in a bag and place them in the regular waste.

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Torah Study Explained

About fifteen years ago, a group of college students visited Ner Israel. These were students with no religious background whatsoever, and they were being given a tour of the Yeshiva. So to really give them the full experience they were paired up with a couple of us in the Yeshiva and we were instructed to more »

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The First Humanist – Shabbos Chol Hamoed

Today, I’d like to talk about humanism. Humanism is defined by the International Humanist and Ethical Union as: “…a democratic and ethical life stance, which affirms that human beings have the right and responsibility to give meaning and shape to their own lives. It stands for the building of a more humane society through an ethic based more »

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A Jewish View on Wealth and Poverty – Part Two

“In the middle of the 17th century, the Vaad Arba Aratzot, the Council of Four Lands, an all-powerful body of rabbis and lay leaders, governing the Jewish communities of Europe made a decree that the more guests one invited to a festive occasion, the more one had to pay to the community tax collector – more »

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A Jewish Perspective on Wealth and Poverty Part 1

On November 9, 1922, Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel prize for his groundbreaking work in physics. The only problem was that he wasn’t in Stockholm to receive his prize. Einstein had committed to giving some lectures in Japan and he was too much of a mench to cancel them. While in Japan, he stayed more »

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(Not) Too Late Yom Kippur Yizkor

On October 17, 1895, Yechezkel Taub was born in a small Polish town, to a prestigious rabbinic family. His father was a popular Chassidic rebbe, meaning he had a large group of devoted followers. These Chassidim were not the ones we imagine when we think of Eastern European Jews. They were a rather affluent group more »

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Candles for Diamonds Kol Nidrei

I have a confession to make. (I know, I know, wrong religion) My confession is that I really struggle with Kol Nidrei. I am moved by the haunting tune, who isn’t? There’s something magical about all the Sifrei Torah being taken out of the ark. I love that too. It’s the prayer itself that just more »

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